0033 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors: Patricia Rodemann

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

Today we talked with Patricia (Cia) Rodemann, the Director of Business Development and Communications for Pomegranate Health Systems, a provider of adolescent psychiatric services.

Pomegranate has both residential and crisis centers.

Pomegranate accepts patients from all over Ohio on a 24/7 basis via professional referrals only. Interventions typically start with a parent bringing a child to the emergency room or Net Care. Pediatricians and counselors can also refer directly.

If in crisis in Ohio call That Care Access, 614-276-2273, or go to the nearest emergency room. Also one can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.

Cia described how a component of care is parents having a hard-to-heart connection with their children, watching for changes in mood or behaviors. It is important to pay attention to small cues.

She also discusses misconceptions and mistakes regarding suicide. She writes a personal experience where it would be better if she would have intervened.

Pomegranate has a blog serving as a resource guide for articles on adolescence mental-and behavioral health issues. The website is www.pomegranatecares.com.

In terms of periodicity, times of high drama throughout the school year can have a big impact on children.

The decision-making process has to deciding whether inpatient or outpatient care is required is discussed.

Pomegranate is performing leading-edge DNA-based diagnoses and prescribing, leading to better and more effective selection of drug regimens.

Pomegranate also provides trauma-inform care which is based on what has happened to the child.

Finally, post discharge instructions following acute care are shared.

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0028 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Dr. Lee LeGrice

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.

In the Dallas – Ft. Worth area you can get help at Mental Health of America of Greater Tarrant County’s web site (http://www.mhatc.org/) or call (817) 546-7826.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

LOSSTeam information can be gotten at www.lossteam.com.

02:41 Introduction.

03:08 1-in-4 effected by mental health issues. Dr. Lee LeGrice (DrLeeLeGrice.com) starts by saying 1 in 4 Americans are impacted by mental health issues.

04:11 LOSSTeam formation and being a survivor. She proceeds to discuss how the LOSSTeam came about by the efforts by her and others (Regina Preatorious and Lezlie Culver). She shares the impact of her own story as a suicide survivor who lost a high school friend and how it provided impetus to be involved in creating the LOSSTeam. Similar to other survivors, she still thinks about and feels the loss of that friend and its impact, especially wondering if there was something different she could have done to help that friend. That thinking ranges out to include the lost loved one’s family and other friends.

06:36 Overcoming stigma-being there for others. Dr LeGrice encourages the listener to approach someone they may feel is at risk and get beyond the possible though, “If I bring it up I’ll be putting the idea of suicide in their mind.” If a person is at risk they are already thinking about suicide so push through the discomfort and reach out.

07:40 The LOSSTeam and community. By participating with the LOSSTeam you might just help someone who is suffering mental health issues and/or is at risk for completing suicide. It is this spirit that brought the team members together.

08:53 The importance of survivors to the LOSSTeam. Dr. LeGrice mentions the major contribution made by Lezlie Culver in getting the team started and bringing it to community.

09:54 Shame, confusion, and ambivalence. The signs of suicide may not be that clear. People at risk can be ambivalent and go back and forth between living and wanting to die. One should stay away from blaming self for missing signs of suicide because it may not be that clear.

11:56 The challenge of making sense. The difficult feelings can arise from our desire to make sense of the suicide, an event that turns one’s world upside down. Acceptance and finding a place within oneself for the lost loved one is discussed.

13:14 If at risk…connect…create a space. Having friends and being able to broach difficult topics such as suicide is recommended. It is normal to have periodic thoughts about suicide so the risk of bringing up the topic may be less than anticipated. By broaching the subject the stigma can be reduced. Dr. LeGrice recommends coming up along side the at-risk individual and listen, offer connect. Doing that first will help the person in finding a solution to the problem they are trying to solve.

18:15 LOSSTeam members walk along side. The ability to be with a recent survivor and calmly provide acceptance and understanding, even without speaking, is one of the powers of the LOSSTeam member.

19:38 Mythology – the common experience. The LOSSTeam member brings the universality of the experience of loss to the situation and is able to help the recent survivor, at times starting at eye contact.

20:56 What if they ARE having suicidal thoughts? Training models can be found that help in answering that question. It’s important, though, to be able to talk with an at-risk friend in a simple, direct, supportive manner. In other words, a lot of times it really helps for a friend to just be with the at-risk individual and affirm the sharing of the suicidal thoughts. The importance of finding a mental health professional after a conversation is opened is stressed. The friend just provides friendship. Counseling is for others.

23:59 Professionals and their understanding/training. Dr. LeGrice discusses resources available to professionals in a metropolitan area vs. more sparsely populated areas. The importance of primary care physicians including screening as part of intake interviews as well as periodically is stressed. This is especially true when dealing with a person not showing outward symptoms. Web and phone capabilities are discussed as well. LOSSTeam.com is referenced as a good place to start in looking for resources.

28:24 Personal impact of LOSSTeam work on Dr. LeGrice. Dr. LeGrice shares the growth experiences she has experienced by performing the challenging work associated with being a suicide survivor as well as a mental health professional. She shares the story of being called out in response to a 16 year old having completed suicide and having to be with the parents — the same day she was celebrating her 10 year old son’s birthday and the resulting confluence. Not only did it have a personal impact it influenced her professional practice. She discusses the heightened awareness of life and the fact we don’t know what our tomorrow will bring so enjoy what one has today.

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.

In the Dallas – Ft. Worth area you can get help at Mental Health of America of Greater Tarrant County’s web site (http://www.mhatc.org/) or call (817) 546-7826.

LOSSTeam information can be gotten at www.lossteam.com.

Comments or questions? Send and email including your name to comments@thriveandconnect.com or leave a message at 614-664-7650. We will respond in a later episode.

35:45 END

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0027 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Jennifer Fry

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.

Jennifer is a LOSSTeam. More information on the LOSSTeam is available at  (http://www.lossteam.com/hope-candle-hands11205410_s)

Jennifer is the Suicide Outreach Coordinator (OC) for the State of Nebraska as well as being a suicide survivor and can be reached at nebraskalossteam@gmail.com.

We talked about misconceptions regarding suicide and common triggers.

As to the triggers, some common ones include:

  • relationship breakups
  • financial difficulties
  • retirement

With regards to misconceptions: those close to the at-risk individual tend to think the person will be okay with time. Frequently the family dynamic can be broken up because no one knows what to say nor how to respond to the loss of a loved one. In her case, there was no LOSSTeam in Nebraska.

Jennifer spoke of her own journey and how it brought her to her current professional position – she had lost a cousin to whom she was very close. This led her to continue her course work and research into suicide  and connecting with Dr. BeLau. Her position as the OC for Nebraska functions as the central hub for those in Nebraska who need information.

In her work on the LOSSTeam recent survivors can get a sense of understanding and support since Jennifer and others on the team bring their personal experience and, in Jennifer’s case, professional experience.

Part of the outreach work is with county boards of health and clinicians helping raise their awareness and understanding with regards to suicide, at-risk individuals, and responding to situations. This work includes working directly with clinicians, providing training in peer support, signs to watch for, and role-play training.

In determining how to work with those beyond the immediate family and friends there is only anecdotal evidence as to the effectiveness of the outreach program.

Jennifer’s team is working with the Nebraska Work Well Program to provide information for prevention and postvention as to what to do in the work place with potentially at-risk individuals as well as survivors of suicide.

In terms of what has been rewarding for her, she’s found her place in doing work about which she is very passionate.

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0024 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors: Chris Pinkelman

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

Chris Pinkelman is with TCN Behavioral Health Services, Inc. He works with colleges and universities to help at-risk students adapt and integrate into college life. Insurance, financial, prescriptions, and other issues are addressed along with the stressors and other risk factors associated with leaving home.

One of the keys is the health care provider getting in with the schools and working with the resident’s assistance programs.

Students working in the Health Care Coalition were tapped for creating videos, brochures, etc.

A series of recommendations were made that can help the parents and students prepare ahead of time to facilitate integration and lower risks. This includes city, county, and state services that may not be on campus.

Students and parents working ahead of time can help reduce the sense of shame that can be present with mental illness and addiction. This is especially important if the community lacks an understanding of the difficulties.

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0023 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Jeff Cooper

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

Jeff Cooper, a retired chief of detectives currently working with a security agency, shares his story as a survivor of his son Luke’s suicide (2011) and LOSSTeam member.

The LOSSTeam was present at his house when a friend brought him home after telling his father about his son’s death.

Jeff was unfamiliar with the LOSSTeam and was reluctant to talk with them at first.

Over time he maintain contact with the LOSSTeam and began to attend survivor meetings. The one thing that struck him was how much of the LOSSTeam’s resources were women. This created a challenge for Jeff since he was raised to believe men kept their emotions in.

As a LOSSTeam member Jeff was able to help a fellow male survivor whose son had committed suicide. That survivor separated from the family group and went off by himself. Jeff connected with him to help him grieve.

He describes how showing up as a LOSSTeam member helps new survivors because they are in the presence of others who have gone through the same experience.

Jeff referred to a national simulcast regarding suicide held every November (http://www.survivorday.org/).

In seeing other survivors who had progressed in their own healing process Jeff wondered what it would take for him to heal. He realized the importance of integrating the experience of his son’s death into his life in order to both remember his son in a loving way and move forward with his own life. He needed to find meaning in the experience.

The work it took to start his own healing process let him on a journey of helping others.

As a retired law enforcement officer he is able to lend his tactical, detailed experience to helping the survivors in a way that avoids disrupting law enforcement agencies investigating the suicide. Jeff is able to tell the survivors the specifics as to how things will flow. He is also able to help them in terms of requests such as wanting to see their loved one before they’re taken away.

Simultaneously, he can help them with their grieving process… The major activity of the LOSSTeam. This can help with one of the major goals of the LOSSTeam which is to help survivors find a pathway to hope.

Jeff walks through some of the details of his own experience and losing his son.

The conversation shifted to Jeff describing how his view of life and the way he looks at things has changed. His sensitivity to what others experience and the need to take time and not just go through process after process has sharpened. He is also appreciative of those who are alive and in his life.

He describes the pain associated with the memories of how the loved one looked, sounded, etc., as time goes by. The importance of a talisman, e.g., laminated copies of a woman’s son’s fingerprints from around the house, is emphasized. In Jeff’s case he has the hat and other items his son Luke had at the time of the suicide.

Jeff talks about the paradox of in some ways having moved forward while in other ways still being back at that day when his son completed suicide.

(There is a pause in the recording as Jeff addresses feelings that surfaced.)

The importance of apathetic love ones providing support is described.

Details are given as to how stereotypes continue to be practice, e.g., men acting as if they are okay in these highly traumatic situations.

Jeff closes describing the benefits of working with others and helping them with their loss in order to process his own.

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0021 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – Josh Rivedal

National Suicide Prevention Life Line 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255.

In the Dallas – Ft. Worth area you can get help at  Mental Health of America of Greater Tarrant County. www.mhatc.org

LOSSTeam information can be gotten at www.lossteam.comhope-candle-hands11205410_s

We enter our conversation with Josh talking about how people want to avoid the topic of suicide like the plague. He had lost his paternal grandfather and then his father to suicide and no one was allowed to talk about it in the house. Knowledge of the facts would have helped Josh avoid his suicidal crisis.

He discusses the sense of shame that his father had in not wanting to talk about his grandfather’s suicide and how his father took his life on the day his divorce from Josh’s mother was to be finalized. In turn, as with other survivors, this increased the odds of Josh considering and completing suicide.

After his father completed suicide Josh worked to grow his own career and move forward.  IN 2009 – 2010 he created a one-man show, Kicking My Blue Jeans In the Butt, centered on his relationship with his father.

During this time Josh was going through a difficult time with his mother who was suing him with regards to his father’s estate.

He used work to avoid his problems. Slowly he slid into clinical depression. This led to him considering suicide. While in crisis he risked calling his mother. She intuitively had the courage to ask him if he was considering suicide, something that most people are afraid to do because they fear it will encourage the person to do it. She encouraged and helped him to find professional help.

Josh’s recovery process led him to the decision to speak out. He re-framed his one-man show and re-introduced it in 2011, adding educational portions as well as Q&A sessions.

Josh shares the impact the interaction with the audience has had on himself as well as attendees of the show. He now speaks between 35-40 times a year to survival groups, colleges and high schools, and juvenile detention centers.

He is now working with venture capital firms and entrepreneurs on learning how to reframe failure along with his work with LOSSTeams and postvention. He has explored the field of human capital management.

The difficulties associated with exploring grief and the time and effort required for Josh are delineated. This includes his having to “climb in” to his father’s character in his one-man show. It led to empathy and a greater understanding of what his father went through. This helped with his own recovery process.

The interview shifted to the inheritance issue that surfaced after his father completed suicide. Moral honesty vs emotional honesty when someone dies in a power dynamic and the dysfunction comes to the surface is discussed. The importance of seeking help and not isolating in such situations is emphasized.

The pending publication of “Winning the War on Depression and Living Mentally Well” is mentioned along with the currently available “Reengaging With Life, Creating a New You” are mentioned along with information for accessing them. The later book is quite interesting because it has 50 authors who tell their own story and the difficulties they overcame to be more of themselves.  Topics include LGBT, depression, disabilities, and suicide.

This led to talking about the importance of helping others get their story out to the public. It is the beginning of any great movement such as preventing and recovering from suicide.

Josh describes the importance of each of us telling our story and the fact that we don’t have to be a professional writer or actor to do so. Josh also provides direction to at-risk individuals who might be listening to the podcast.

Coming out of the isolation by helping others is advised. It can give purpose to one’s life.

Carl Jung’s approach to recovery – using one’s own wound/pain and  healing process as a source of inspiration to help others is presented. This can be quite helpful for others since there can be stigma and discrimination associated with suicide.

Josh emphasizes for the survivor that getting their story out is for the reader or the listener. This can help with your healing process.

The i’Mpossible Project: Reengaging with Life, Creating a New You — www.iampossibleproject.com/one

Storytelling guidelines for more i’Mpossible stories: www.iampossibleproject.com/guidelines

The Gospel According to Josh http://www.gospeljosh.com/

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0019 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Amanda Stidam

Amanda Stidam is a LOSSTeam member (www.lossteam.com). She relates her mother’s suicide one day after her 35th birthday, which became a dividing point in her life. She felt alone and didn’t find resources until later. She now dedicates herself to helping make sure there are resources in her county.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

She discusses generational issues with respect to mental illness.

Difficulties communicating with her husband and daughter surfaced over time. A big part of the difficulty was the loss of her mother whom Amanda focused on keeping happy. The death left Amanda having to decide who she would be.

Amanda compartmentalized and became and expert “plate spinner.” She became extremely task-oriented.

Through therapy she learned to like herself and process her mother’s suicide.

When working on the LOSSTeam and making contact with a recent survivor she goes back in time to her mother’s suicide and uses that experience to help the recent survivor.

Amanda shares the tools she uses for herself in helping others to deal with being recent survivors.

Her advice to someone who feels lost right now is this: “You matter!”

Amanda describes how to get a lost one’s name on her marathon running shirt via a Facebook link Suicide Sucks Run.

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0018 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Winona Barstow

Winona Barstow is a suicide survivor and LOSSTeam member (www.lossteam.com). The LOSSTeam provides comfort and support without giving advice or therapy. It directs the survivor towards resources hope-candle-hands11205410_sthat can help.

Winona was 10 years old when she experienced the loss of her loved one, her mother. She received no counseling and was told to accept it and just move on. The next 10 years were very rough. She looked and acted like her deceased mother, which triggered her primary caregiver, her grandmother.

Her grandmother dies 5 years after her mother. Winona was then forced to live with another relative followed by becoming a ward of the state.

This led to drugs and alcohol plus tumultuous marriages.

Eventually, she attempted suicide herself.

Under the care of an empathetic counselor Winona started transitioning by going back to age 10 and moving forward. It has helped her with her own children and improving her own mental health.

Being on the LOSSTeam has helped her recovery by being able to be present for others.

Winona is pleased with how she has reclaimed her life. Counseling has helped her get the focus off herself and instead help others.

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0017 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Phyllis Crevison

Phyllis Crevison is a survivor of suicide who talks about the loss of her son and her recovery path that led her to joining the LOSSTeam (http://www.lossteam.com/hope-candle-hands11205410_s).

Phyllis shares the difficulties her son experienced including difficulties i romantic relationships plus education and challenges in the military.

The one big thing she came to realize is even if it is someone you think will never do it, you don’t know how desperate they might be. Fear of death can disappear. They are just looking for a path out of the suffering.

Phyllis talks about the initial shock she felt that seemed like an unrealistic dream pushing her to the edge and the gratitude she has for the compassion shown by the LOSSTeam that showed up after her son completed suicide. Now, as a LOSSTeam member herself she tells of the empathy she can bring to the situation.

Phyllis emphasizes the need to take the loss one day at a time. There can be times that one gets triggered and needs to just take it as it comes.

Building a remembrance scrap book with her son’s friends was hard but healing.

Again, her advice to listeners of this podcast is to take it one day at a time and work through it. It CAN get better.

She emphasizes the importance of respecting the reality that different people have different paths back to health.

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0016 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Greta Mayer

Greta Mayer chairs the Suicide Prevention Coalition (http://www.mhrb.org/suicide-prevention.aspx) in Clark, Greene, and Madison Counties in Ohio as of Sept, 2014.

She talks about interfacing with suicide survivors and what she, as a professional, has learned from hope-candle-hands11205410_ssurvivors.

In addition to making positive connections, Greta brings up the need to expand LOSSTeams in order to provide more services, especially with regards to survivors understanding other survivors. Clinicians can only go so far.

Also, clinicians and agencies themselves need additional resources in order to build a peer-to-peer connection network for supporting the suicide survivor and all the aspects of their life which is impacted by suicide.

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0015 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam – Misconceptions: Dr. David Miers

Dr. David Miers (http://www.bryanhealth.com/) share the misconceptions suicide survivors run into on a routine basis. These misconceptions stigmatize survivors to the extent they will choose to stay quiet and withdraw. This is especially true hope-candle-hands11205410_swith regards to being asked, “Why?” as to why their loved one completed suicide.

Another question that can make the situation even worse is, “Why aren’t you over it yet?”

What is needed is the understanding grief is a process and journey requiring support and listening rather than statements such as, “Pull yourself up by the bootstraps.”

In terms of providing support what is better is doing the work of providing space for the survivor to process and remember what is good about the deceased individual. Communication is key. This is one of the key activities the LOSSTeam (www.lossteam.com) provides. The LOSSTeam supports the family and social structure heal and stay intact.

A large component of this is understanding and helping overcome the fear survivors feel. Support individuals can simply ask open-ended, neutral questions such as, “Tell me about your loved one,” and not comment.

How LOSSTeams work and can be called upon is explained. There is no counseling or therapeutic activity. There is just listening and pointing towards resources that can help.

Families who don’t contact LOSSTeams or similar support resources can take up to five years to reach out and ask for support. Those who had contact with the LOSSTeam reached out to resources within 39 days.

Postvention (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postvention) is defined: reaching out for support after the loved one completed suicide.

Local county health boards can be contacted to find support.

For the LOSSTeam to be effective the survivor support network needs to be in place.

Dr. Miers shares how common it is for those who are suicide survivors to have thoughts of suicide themselves, being 9 times more at risk than the general population. Thus, the importance of reaching out for support after a loved one has completed suicide.

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0014 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam – Bullying: Dr. Don Belau

Dr. Don Belau (http://www.nelossteam.nebraska.edu/) shares his thoughts on two topics: his research and work on bullying and the separate topic of the history of the LOSSTeam (www.lossteam.com) conference and the benefits it provides.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

With regards to the LOSSTeam conference: it provides a forum for LOSSTeams from around the world to come together and share their work, insights, and, experience. He emphasizes how this work has helped build trust with law enforcement agencies at a local level.

Dr. Belau describes the dynamics of bullying, self-injurious behavior, their impact on at-risk-for-suicide children, and how to deal with the situation. A critical component for success is the acceptance of the at-risk child by their family. Friends and other key adults are important as well since the at-risk child may approach parents last, talking with others first.

Behavior techniques for changing behavior are explained for both the bully and victim. Included in these changes are the 3 D’s:

– Diffuse the words;
– Distract the bully’s thinking through verbal or physical techniques, and;
– Distance oneself from the bully.

Roll play and practice is encouraged.

The impact of fear and loss of control are discussed.

Schools can form support groups to practice the 3 D’s.

The impact of peer groups is discussed along with the ineffectiveness of just shaming/blaming the bully and calling their parents. Giving up on the bully can hinder improving the situation for the at-risk child. Better is teaching the bully pro-social skills, different responses, and the value of making amends.

Switching topics back to the LOSSTeams and what they can provide: support to those who survive suicide. The is especially true when those around the survivor go back to their daily routines.

The idea of having a sponsor frame-of-mind is discussed.

Dr. Belau shares the value of better training for 2 groups of people:

– Clinicians helping those with suicidal ideation as well as survivors of suicide, and;
– Those in colleges and universities training in the field of mental health.

Emphasis is placed on healing with the heart rather than only having a cognitive focus.

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0013 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – Ohio Supreme Court Justice (ret.) Evelyn Stratton

Retired Ohio Supreme Court Justice Evelyn Stratton discusses her path of increased awareness of and desire to help those with mental illness, individuals who should be in the health care system rather than prison.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

She shares her personal experience of losing a close friend who had lost his wife to suicide and in turn decided to end his own life.

The fact is mentioned that lawyers have a rate of depression three times greater than the normal population.

She also points out that suicide doesn’t always have the face of mental illness.

By helping the survivors of suicide deal with their issues the odds increase that they will become healthy and stay healthy. Her advice to those around a survivor is to be proactive. Don’t wait to be called, go ahead and contact them.

It can help to wait a few weeks after the traumatic event. It may fill a void created by those who initially help but eventually have to go back to their daily routine.

Justice Stratton points out that friends of the deceased may have their own difficulties even though not a relative. This can apply to friends at work or a cashier at the store. They should seek support as needed.

The possible ambivalence towards life and the fact an individual can go back and forth between wanting to live and wanting to die is discussed. She relates a friend who acted normal while planning his own suicide. The signs aren’t always there to observe in a clear-cut manner.

Suicide and mental difficulties among the military and how the legal system should deal with them is discussed along with the difficulties of reintegrating into daily life. She relates how her experience in this arena has shown the value of veteran courts being used to help these at-risk individuals. Specifically there are veteran justice outreach specialists available to help veterans in the criminal justice system. There are 17 such veteran courts in Ohio.

Justin Stratton discusses drug-and mental health courts and how they accept the challenge of getting the individual out of the criminal justice system through support.

7000 police officers in Ohio have been trained with regards to mental health issues. She stresses, though, that one not need wait for others to take on the responsibility. Just reach out and try to help one veteran. If you want to help you can go to the Ohio Department of Veteran Services if you want to help if you want to help whose website provides a great deal of services and resources.

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0012 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – Post-Traumatic Growth: Dr. Melinda Moore

Dr. Melinda Moore talks about her current area of research which is military suicide bereavement. She has also worked in the nonmilitary sectors as well.

She references her website www.posttraumaticgrowth.com which was used for her dissertation research. It now is open to the general public for those who are interested in bereavement information.hope-candle-hands11205410_s

The potential for growth in an individual who has been berieved by suicide is presented.

This post traumatic growth is a positive psychological construct that occurs with individuals who have experience psychological trauma.

Dr. Moore describes the loss of her husband Connor in 1996 and how reading Dr. Edwin edit Edwin Shneidman’s book, “The Suicidal Mind,” was beneficial in dealing with the unrealistic, tremendous responsibility she felt for issues outside of her control. This can tend to be a gender-based issue since women typically are the caretakers and their family.

Shneidman discusses how women can be held responsible for their husband’s suicide.

Dr. Moore discusses the risk of falling into a shame state which frequently is reinforced by those around the survivor. This can reinforce the internalization of the suicide and withdrawal from society that the survivor is feeling.

Dr. Moore’s advice to a listener who’s experiencing that withdrawal is go to the Internet and find as much information as you can from reputable organizations such as the American Association of Suicidology (www.suicidology.org), books by Jack Jordan and John McIntosh, Frank Campbell’s website (www.LOSSteams.com), and other sources referred to in podcast. Suicide bereavement organizations are also recommended. References can be found at the American Association of Suicidology.

Seeking out local support groups as well as online support groups is highly encouraged.

The stereotypes that men can run into when they are survivors of suicide are discussed. This includes the stereotype of men being expected to hide their feelings in difficult situations and when feeling pain.

Survivors are encouraged to let go of beating themselves up over the belief that there were some signs they had missed regarding the loved one considering suicide.

However, if some loved one does indicator having thoughts of suicide then be supportive in helping them find the proper resources.

The challenges parents face when there are surviving children are also discussed. There is a very complicated balancing act required for the parents not only deals with throne grief but is supportive of the surviving children in dealing with their grief. Seeking immediate help from competent professionals is strongly recommended. It is important to keep in mind that not all psychological professionals are trained in addressing the issues associated with suicide. The Dougy Center for Grieving Children (http://www.dougy.org) is a great resource for grieving children as well as parents.

Dr. Moore talks about the personal satisfaction she is felt by helping others who have gone through the experience of losing a loved one through suicide.

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0011 Thrive and Connect: Suicide Survivors – LOSSTeam: Dr. Frank Campbell

Dr. Frank Campbell (www.lossteam.com) describes how the LOSSteam was created to provide support (postvention) for those left behind after someone completes suicide.He found through his years of practice people at hope-candle-hands11205410_srisk for suicide would have reached out for help sooner if they knew where to go. People who did find resources did so through stumbling across available resources.

Childhood and generational issues and the connection with suicide are discussed.

Dr. Campbell shares the challenges of people not familiar with crime scene etiquette showing up to help survivors of suicide.

LOSSteams developed around the need to support survivors of suicide while practicing the appropriate etiquette to avoid contaminating a potential homicide scene.

The stresses the surviving family and loved ones face at the scene are described along with what the LOSSteams can provide in terms of support.

Dr. Melinda Moore’s presentation on posttraumatic growth is woven into the discussion. Those who have recovered from major trauma can gain a sense of the work that needs to be done as a suicide survivor and take on the challenge. In fact, by doing this they might be better able to help others who have survived suicide.

The difference between grief, trauma, and bereavement is presented.

Victor Frankel’s, and Joseph Campbell’s, along with Gestalt therapy and psychodrama’s understanding one can’t think their way through trauma is used to show the need to work through one’s individual trauma with proper support in order to heal. This is especially true when working through day-to-day reminders that can feel insane.

The use of a talisman and healing representing the deceased is shown to be valuable when working to stay connected to self.

Dr. Campbell shows how the survivor can get back into life and feel well.

The LOSSteam members do best just being with the survivor initially, seeing them as they are, and pointing the way towards health without counseling.

The disorientation associated with suicide is compared to the untethered experience of astronauts in the movie “Gravity.”

Dr. Campbell closes discussing the growth that has occurred with LOSSteams in Ohio and the good feeling that goes with it. For more information go to www.lossteams.com.

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